VOL. 27 - NO. 17
AUG 14 - 21, 2022
PO BOX 13283
OAKLAND, CA 94661-0283

510.595.7777 FAX
SUBSCRIPTION RATE:
$25/YEAR
home
home
home
home

Joint Forces Journal is published privately, and in no way is connected with DoD, the U.S. Army, Navy, Air Force or Coast Guard. This website and the printed newspaper are intended for the members of the Armed Forces and their families. Contents do not necessarily reflect official views of the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense or the U.S. Army, Navy, Air Force or Coast Guard, and do not imply endorsements thereof. The marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchases, user or patron for advertisers prohibited. If a violation or rejection of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. Editorial content is prepared and edited privately, and is provided by the Public Affairs Office of U.S. Army, Navy, Air Force and Coast Guard installations. Correspondence and material for publication should be addressed to: Editor, Joint Forces Journal, P.O. Box 13283, Oakland, CA, 94661-0283. Deadline for receiving articles and photos is 3 p.m. Monday for publication on Friday of that week. Joint Forces Journal editorial policy is to use bylines and photo credits where applicable and when submitted.

Navy Destroyer Bears Name of Decorated Marine Killed in WWII

Jun 24, 2022
BATH, Maine (AP) — The recent christening of a Navy destroyer highlighted the sacrifices of two generations — the ship’s namesake killed in World War II and another Marine who died more than 60 years later.

The future USS Basilone bears the name of a Marine who was awarded the Medal of Honor before his death on Iwo Jima.

Breaking a bottle on the ship's bow for good luck was a woman who lost her brother in an ambush in Fallujah, Iraq.

The legacy and sacrifice of such Marines are never forgotten, Sgt. Major of the Marine Corps Troy Black told a crowd of 2,000 gathered next to the warship at Navy shipbuilder Bath Iron Works in Maine.

Gunnery Sgt. John Basilone was awarded the Medal of Honor for heroism while defending Henderson Field against a fierce assault by a 3,000-strong Japanese force during the Battle of Guadalcanal in 1942.

The New Jersey resident returned home to a hero’s welcome and a parade. But he asked to rejoin his comrades and died on the opening day of the invasion of Iwo Jima in February 1945. He was awarded the Navy Cross posthumously for heroism that day.

His 92-year-old brother Donald and others at the ceremony spoke of Basilone's patriotism, dedication and bravery.

That included his insistence on returning to combat instead of staying safe for the remainder of the war. “He really wanted to go back,” Donald Basilone said in statement read by his niece.

Ryan Manion, whose brother, Marine 1st Lt. Travis Manion, was killed in Iraq, said both her brother and the ship’s namesake were cut from the same cloth even though they were from different generations.

“John Basilone was a young patriot who joined the military to do his job when his country needed him the most,” she said.

The ceremony marked a milestone in construction of the 509-foot guided-missile destroyer. Dignitaries included admirals, family members, Democratic Gov. Janet Mills and Republican Sen. Susan Collins.

Manion, who is one of the ship’s sponsors, is president of the Pennsylvania-based Travis Manion Foundation, which aims to empower veterans and families of fallen heroes, using her brother's words, “If not me, then who?”

Her brother was killed by a sniper when he exposed himself to enemy fire to get an advantageous firing position and draw attention away from wounded Marines during an ambush in 2007 in Iraq.

* * * * *

Photo caption: The superstructure of the future USS Basilone and a crane are seen on Saturday, June 18, at Bath Iron Works in Bath, Maine. The christening of a Navy destroyer on Saturday highlighted the sacrifices of two generations — the ship’s namesake killed in World War II and another Marine who died more than 60 years later. The future USS Basilone bears the name of a Marine who was awarded the Medal of Honor before his death on Iwo Jima. (AP Photo/David Sharp)


subscribe

Legendary Blue Angels Squadron Announces First Female Jet Pilot

Fighter Jet Blown Off Carrier Deck in Unexpected Heavy Weather

Woody Williams, Last WWII Medal of Honor Recipient, Lies in Honor at Capitol Rotunda

TRAVEL & ENTERTAINMENT: TheatreWorks Silicon Valley Presents the World Premiere of “Nan and the Lower Body”

Last of the Doolittle Raiders, Dick Cole, Dies at 103

TRAVEL & ENTERTAINMENT: Rock-Star Stylings of Lee Rocker of the Stray Cats Comes to Livermore’s Bankhead Theater

Coast Guard Academy Welcomes 302 Swabs for Day One

Air Force to Promote Fewer Noncommissioned Officers as Worries About Inexperience Grow

TRAVEL & ENTERTAINMENT: Woodminster Summer Musicals Presents “ON YOUR FEET! The Story of Emilio & Gloria Estefan”

Singing 82nd Airborne Soldiers Have an Unlikely Hit with Video Filmed at Fort Bragg