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Coast Guard, Navy Divers Recover Torpedoes in Freezing Arctic

Mar 30, 2018
ARCTIC CIRCLE -- Divers from U.S. Navy Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit (MDSU) Two, Underwater Construction Team (UCT) One and the U.S. Coast Guard braved harsh Arctic waters to play a critical role during a torpedo exercise as part of Ice Exercise (ICEX) 2018.

ICEX 2018 is a five-week biennial exercise that allows the Navy to assess its operational readiness in the Arctic, increase experience in the region, advance understanding of the Arctic environment, and continue to develop relationships with other services, allies and partner organizations.

During the exercise, the Seawolf-class fast-attack submarine USS Connecticut (SSN 22) and the Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarine USS Hartford (SSN 768) each fired several training torpedoes under the ice. Training torpedoes have no warheads and carry minimal fuel.

"The primary objective of this year's ICEX is to test new under-ice weapons systems and validate tactics for weapon employment," said Ryan Dropek, Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division Newport, RI Weapons Test Director. "Once the divers recover these torpedoes, we can extract important data about how they perform and react in these conditions."

After the submarines fire the torpedoes, helicopters transport gear and personnel to the location where the positively-buoyant torpedo is expected to run out of fuel. Each torpedo has a location device in order to assist in the search. Once found, a 3-4 person team will then drill a series of holes for the divers to enter and exit, as well as one hole for the torpedo to be lifted by helicopter.

"Once we know the location of the torpedo and drill holes, our divers slip into the water to begin placing weights on a line attached to the tail end of the torpedo," Chief Warrant Officer Michael Johnson, officer-in-charge of MDSU-2 divers, explained. "The weights help shift the torpedo from a state of positive buoyancy to neutral buoyancy under the ice."

Once the torpedo is neutral, the divers place brackets with cables to the top and bottom of the body of the torpedo. A helicopter then connects to the torpedo before lifting it vertically out of the hole.

The three dive teams completed additional training in preparation for diving in the unique environment of the Arctic Ocean.

"To prepare for ICEX, we completed training at the Coast Guard's Cold Water Ice Diving (CWID) course and earned our ordnance handling certification from the Naval Undersea Warfare Center," said Johnson. "Additionally, each unit completed MK48 Torpedo recovery training and Unit Level Training (ULT) classroom training on hypothermia, frostbite, ice camp operations, dry-suit, and cold-water ice diving."

The USCG CWID course is a two-week course in Seattle, WA hosted by the USCG instructors at Naval Diving and Salvage Training Center (NDSTC) which focuses on the use of equipment and diving operations in harsh Arctic waters. During the course, divers complete a diving practical in Loc de Roc, British Columbia at 5,000 ft. elevation to put environmental stresses on the divers and equipment to acclimate to the cold and altitude.

"Our Underwater Construction Teams have always had the ice-diving capabilities, so it was awesome to be invited out to this exercise to make sure we're keeping up with something that we say we can do," said Builder 1st Class Khiaro Promise, assigned to Construction Dive Detachment Alfa.

During ICEX, the divers conducted dives using two different types of diving methods. UCT-1 and the USCG dove with SCUBA equipment, which provides divers with an air supply contained in tanks strapped to the backs of the divers. The divers equip themselves with a communication "smart rope" which is a protected communication cable to the surface that acts as a tending line so support personnel on the surface has positive control of the divers and so they can quickly return to the dive hole.

MDSU-2 divers used the diving system DP2 with configuration one, which provides voice communications and an air supply provided by the surface. This configuration allows the divers to swap the composite air bottles without the diver resurfacing and without interrupting their air supply.

"We decided to use the DP2 system because it performs in arctic conditions very well," said Navy Diver 1st Class Davin Jameson, lead diving supervisor for MDSU-2. "The ability to change our air supply during the dive is critical and allows us to stay under the water a lot longer."

Not only did the divers have an essential role in torpedo recovery, they were also essential to camp operations. "Prior to torpedo retrieval dives, all the divers on ice helped set up the camp and in the building of two runways (one 1,300 and one 2,500-ft)," Senior Chief Navy Diver Michael McInroy, master diver for MDSU-2. "In the camp, everyone has responsibilities to keep operations on track. The divers worked hard to do their part in and out of the water."

MDSU-2 is an expeditionary mobile unit homeported at Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Ft. Story (JEBLCFS) in Norfolk, Va. The unit deploys in support of diving and salvage operations and fleet exercises around the world. The primary mission is to direct highly-mobile, fully-trained and equipped mobile diving and salvage companies to perform combat harbor clearance, search and expeditionary salvage operations including diving, salvage, repair, assistance, and demolition in ports or harbors and at sea aboard Navy, Military Sealift Command, or commercial vessels of opportunity in wartime or peacetime.

UCT-1 is also homeported at JEBLCFS and is worldwide deployable to conduct underwater construction, inspection, repair and demolition operations. Seabees operated off the coast of Alaska for the first time in 1942 when they began building advanced bases on Adak, Amchitka and other principal islands in the Aleutian chain.

ICEX divers and their support elements are a proven and vital component to the success of this five-week exercise. The partnership between the Navy and Coast Guard builds on the foundation of increasing experience and operational readiness even in the one of the harshest regions of the world.

"The brotherhood in diving means we have a lot of trust in that other person when you go underwater, and you get close to your coworkers, it's more of a family," Promise said.

* * * * *

Photo caption: Chief Hospital Corpsman Kristopher Mandaro, assigned to Underwater Construction Team One (UCT 1), surfaces from a waterhole during a torpedo exercise in the Arctic Circle in support of Ice Exercise (ICEX) 2018. (U.S. Navy photo/Daniel Hinton)


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